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20100101
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
karzai government who stole the election and ruled only topple. so much of afghanistan is effectively run by the taliban. in addition, we've had eight years with the u.s. has isolated between the kinetic counterterrorism strategy and a counterinsurgency strategy that tries to protect people. and we have seen the last oscillation of that. this happened during the bush administration, and now it's happening again in the obama administration that we are moving back to a counterinsurgency strategy. now besides afghanistan being a much harder, not to crack that iraq we now have a lot of domestic factors affecting the u.s. policy. the american public is war weary after two wars stretched out over many years. and i think it's politically perilous for any politician in a democracy to escalate a war that is already unpopular, even lbj didn't do that when he escalated the vietnam war. u.s. spending in afghanistan is more per year than any other military spends on the planet. so we're dumping a lot of resources into afghanistan. the afghan war is expected to cost another trillion dollars over the ne
karzai and his leadership to address this. >> what's your sense of that? have you seen any change in president's karzai steps? >> he's looking to ministers. he and i actually talked about this. his strategic intent is there. what struck me in meeting with these elders was the evolution of this corruption. so, it wasn't something that was always there. it's been over the last decade or so that they spoke to it. these same elders said to me that they were embarrassed that the united states soldier, sailors, airmen, marines were dying for them. they want to lead this effort. they appreciate what we've done, but they really want to lead this effort and this is something i know the president, president karzai is trying to engender in his leadership with his people. >> but what you talk about the leadership issue. you talked in the past about interviews about the critical need of good, local leadership. president karzai, by many accounts, is not moving forward in his second term. you know, his appointments to the cabinet were largely rejected by parliament and many on grounds that these
others have spoken to the need for president karzai and his leadership to address this. >> what's your sense of that? have you seen any change in president karzai's footsteps? >> initially -- he was -- looking to ministers and he and i actually talked about this in his strategic intent is there. what struck me in meeting with these elders was the evolution of this corruption. so it wasn't something that was always there. it has been over the last decade or so that they spoke to it. these same elders said to me that they were embarrassed, that the united states soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines were dieing and they want to lead this effort. they appreciate what we have done but they really want to lead this effort and this is something i know the president, president karzai, is trying to engender in his leadership with his people. >> you talk about the leadership issue and talked in the past and in interviews about the critical need of good local leadership. president karzai, by many accounts, is not moving forward in his second term. the -- his appointments to the cabinet were largely
responsibiliti forces late this year, or early next year. president hamid karzai said that training the afghans could take five to ten years. and that foreign troops might be needed for 15 years. in tonight's lead focus, we're going to hr about another key component of the emerging afghanistan strategy. from london, chris ship of itn tells us about the newly devised plan to win over the taliban by buying their support. >> reporter: it is easy to be cynical about the conference in afghanistan. in a stately mansion in london where they ate sea bass for lunch. but 60 countries are here today, working on an international plan to end the grueling conflict which has been dragging on for nine years. for the first time the world's military and diplomat elite are preparing a high-risk strategy of buying off the taliban and talking to their leaders. >> let us welcome the plans from president karzai and the government of afghanistan. for an afghan led peace and reintegration program that offers insurgents a way back into mainstream ife. on the condition that they continue to renounce violence, cut any tie
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
. the book centers on this incident which i described where u.s. special operators blocked hamid karzai's planned governor for kabul. she interweaves into it a very well-written and interestingly a history that is well-written, well-organized, and based on a lot of her own research with the original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from joe haversty's book "the opium season" which details a year in which he was involved in as a subcontractor in the usaid efforts in 2 004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with the work force from up opium production. it gives a great view of the violence and corruption. and moreover it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is rory stewart, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked to kabul in the winter which is supposed to kill you and through pashtun villages and described that experienc
. karzai -- having legitimacy, and i do not think we have that. this will depend on achieving security, which i think is achievable, and with good government comes with our own money invested in jobs. without jobs, afghanistan will not be a positive scenario in the future, but i must conclude by pointing out that this is not going to affect our domestic national security, as we see with the last three plots. the underwear bomber came from nine cheerio region with -- came from nigeria. one of them came from somalia, and major hassan came from washington, d.c. thank you very much. [applause] >> peter has to leave at 11:00, so he should take the first few questions, and there is a microphone in the back of the room for anyone who would like to ask a question. >> i work 30 years of the journalists. i retired two years ago. my question is for peter. what i hear now is exactly what i was hearing before the iraq war, and the promise was saddam hussein was on popular. then we will have a democracy. now it is an islamic system. there is a hypothesis that afghan people love us. the last point i
. >> let us wcome the plans fm presiden karzai andhe gornment of afghanistan. resurgence who are prepared to renouniolence offer them a way back gqz mainstam l. >> reporter: the leaders will back a multimillion pound fund split taliban fighters. into those motivatedby ideology and thoseotivated by money. e military alone cannot win is war, it means a political settlement with the taliban is becoming a harsh reality. we must rch out to all of our countrymen. especially our disenchanted brotherswho are not part of al qaeda, or other interests. >> repter: that will include members al qaeda. >> if they put down their weaponsb-u accept the afgh democry, i don't see anyway forheir reintration into the afghan society. >> reporter: iran is a notle absent from these lks, where e internatnal coalition knows itoes not haveong befo public good will toward afghanisnuns dry. >> even before today's meeting, efforts were bng made t buy the suppt of afghans who might turn against the taliban. the new york time reports tt the leaders ofone of the largestribes in southeast afghanistan arfed up with
stated to be beginning about 18 months after to give karzai and his regime enough time to stand up and fight for itself. we will see. host: we have our numbers on the screen and we will get to the calls in immelman. -- in a moment. you laid out a number of issues which have to be practical issues that have to be dealt with, but the fact of the matter is that you bring vietnam and it becomes a political issue as well. tell us how you view this as a political issue. guest: the lesson that we need to learn, i think, from john kennedy's experience is this. he was with -- he was withdrawing at the time. we have the classified documents. but he did not tell the truth to the american people why? for political reasons. he wanted to get it reelected in 1964. he had begun to order the withdrawal in 1963. host: and these would have been the trainer said you talked about. guest: 16,000 of visors, not combat troops. but my point is that obama should not repeat that experience. he is clearly going to do the best that we can in a given amount of time, but what we face the prospect -- if we face t
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it@@@@@@p it's a common problem i've seen in every war i've been involved in. let's not confuse the number of cell phones with low the war is going. let's not minimize that cell phone penetration is a hugely important
ability for governments. this was discussed at length to present karzai, and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably in putting the trip that hillary clinton and i made an afghanistan in october 18 and 19th in conjunction with president karzai's inauguration. the afghans understood this. they are very comfortable with it. . . to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it helped -- influenced me a lot as we tried to develop our own benchmarks. but i think we have to be very careful about two things. maybe th
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
on afghanistan, the london conference will be attended by president karzai the u.n. secretary general vana and 60 nations will be represented. we will be announcing new figures for nato forces and for afghan forces in the time to come. and we will be focusing on how the political and civilian surge that we plan in afghanistan can match and complement the military service that is taking place. on wednesday, the day before the first international meeting will be held to agree how we can strengthen support for yemen in its efforts against al qaeda and how we can help the government of yemen with the development and governance. as i said last week in a common statement i made on security, we know that there are terrorist groups with plans to hinchliffe damage on our country and we are always on alert. we will be vigilant against those who seek to destroy and undermine our democracy and our way of life. let me add one thing also at this morning. i sent my condolences to president harari and prime minister mellis after the crash of the ethiopian airways flight on the coast of lebanon and we are working
accusations against president karzai's relatives, brothers, part of this drug trade. >> we are talking about two different subject matters here. certainly the minister in afghanistan is very weak. he has no ability to enforce the law. it is nothing. it is sort of a moral role. i guess that is what tom meant when he says it is ineffective. certainly he's very clear. i never had one single word against him in terms of him being involved. then there is a different element, which i brought up, the question of corruption. corruption in kabul. corruption in the provinces. corruption in the army. that's a different issue and i would consider it one of most dangerous ones and one of the most urgent to be dealt with. >> gretchen, last word to you. as this re-assessment of afghan policy goes on, as this crisis in governance in afghanistan is playing itself out, how is this going to help or hinder, more like likely, the effort to control the drugs? >> well, i think at the same time that the drug problem creates challenges. it also presents opportunities. my research among the people of afghanistan and
they are ready to sign up and support car sky. -- karzai. there is a distinction between the foot soldier and the leaders who gave a safe hache to osama bin laden and al qaeda from which they launched attacks on this country on 9/11. so he sees the distinction. i don't think it should be lost on you. i think we can look at think with some subtlety between these two. and go after the foot soldiers and try to win them over. and ultimately figure out what to do with the hierarchy as we go up the ladder. now, omar is probably the extreme, the foot soldiers are the other extreme. question is what happens to the others? can they be won over? can they become a part of the political fabric that gates spoke of? and that's i think what we are all trying to figure out. i don't know that we have an answer yet. >> at what point does the 30,000 new troops, the department set up to begin accepting converts, from the taliban, reconciliation sectors, like south america. >> it's not an issue for the department. this is an issue for the government of afghanistan. clearly just reading president karzai's comm
, we have bad memories of the taliban. while embattled president hamid karzai is ridi his post election wave of hope. polling in afghanistan is daunting and dangerous. abc news and our partners here sent 168 pollsters out all across the country door-to-door taking the pulse of more than 1,500 people. asking them about ordinary life here. for instance, that covering for women, the burqa, should it be the husband's decision or hers? in this untry, a split decision. women say they should decide. the majority of men say it's the husband's choice. this woman added perspective. "my husband's not the problem," she says. "it's the taliban i'm afraid of." and sometimes small signs of progress. 60% of our polls say they have cell phones. every single one of you? but 85% of them say they have no refrigerator, and in this poor country, few have hope of such a thing. and one more sobering number. more than half of afghans say they have never been to school. >> you can see more of diane's reporting from afghanistan on a special edition of "world news." >>> there's unexpected fallout from senate major
for reforming washington. >> is there a way that can be accomplished? >> president karzai is heading to london this week and he wants some taliban taken off the u.s. sanctions welist in exchange for their laying down their arms. >> you have heard that general petraeus discussed similar type efforts in afghanistan, political reconciliations. you have per general mcchrystal discussed the same thing. obviously, that is a similar path to what happened in iraq. each of those two individuals have talked through this. this is provided that whoever this is accept the event constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks through the groups that advocate violence. that is what people expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> last week, the win put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in of denniston is about $2.3 billion per year which is 25% of their gross domestic product. who in the administration is really writing point on dealing with issues of corruption in afghanistan? >> a group of people working and our afghan policy -- let me figure out where some of that inform
karzai is speaking now, as we can see, shortly following the speech by gordon brown. gordon brown has spoken. we are there, cnbc has sent anna edwards down. we'll be bringing you more updates on that throughout the day here on the channel. do stay with us for more on that, too. let's get back to the equity markets, though. a bit of a roundup on what's going on around the globe. starting out here in the uk, the ftse 100 is higher by 0.9%. pretty steady at these levels. lots of stocks gaining today, obviously, after some fairly steep declines, to be honest. i was just checking. if you look back to the highs of the year so far, that fell on january the 11th. since then, the ftse 100 has fallen some 5.8%. it has been a tough time for the ftse, maybe some bargain hunting, if you like. a couple of sectors are dominating the gainers. banks, barclay's issuing higher along with lloyd's. xstrata, eurasian and kazakhmy's falls in that group, as well. let's go out to germany with patricia. >> finally, we have a positive day out here. and it's the tech stocks as well as the banking stocks doing ve
blocked karzai's plan to governor for kabul. she interweaves a very well- written and interestingly a history that is a well-written, well-organized and based on her own research with original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from the book "the opium season," which details a year in which he was involved as a -- a subcontractor in u.s.a.i.d. efforts in 2004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with a workforce from opium production. it gives a view of the violence, tribal and warlord relations, and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is stored, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban locked to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you -- what to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to value and described the bill which experience in a week -- and described that experience in a way in which any develo
. but early signs are encouraging. we are encouraged by the steps president karzai has taken to approve the effectiveness and credibility of his government, and we're committed to working in partnerships to reduce corruption which along with the insurgency is perhaps the greatest threat to afghanistan. and recent polls of public afghan opinion are also encouraging. afghans in significant numbers blame the taliban far more than coalition forces for violence that exists in the country. most afghans believe the taliban is growing weaker, and by huge margins, about 9-1, clearly prefer the afghan government that they have to any alternative the taliban might offer. but our progress on the ground and the attitudes of the afghan people show we're making progress in achieving our objectives and accomplishing our mission in afghanistan as articulated by the president. the third part of our strategy is a stronger partnership with pakistan. the people of pakistan have suffered greatly at the hands of terrorism. pakistanis, civilians, military, police, civilians have sacrificed their lives fighting
probably take two or three years. and then president karzai really threw cold water on things when he said that afghanistan would not be able to provide for its own security for 15 to 20 years let alone 18 months. so the question is this, when july, 2011 rolls around, will we be at the beginning of the troop withdrawal or just in the middle of it? will we be standing on the cliff or going down the ramp? and will we be at the inflection or point of no return in an open-ended war. the american people and our troops deserve a solid plan. we have the right to know exactly what we're getting into before we start spending billions of dollars more and more and more of our troops' blood. that's why congress must ask the administration some tough questions and demand better answers. you know that's our responsibility, that's our job. especially before we authorize another dime for this foreign occupation. we must make sure that the next appropriation has a much better balance between military and civilian need, a balance that will be considerbly better than the last appropriation. we must make sure
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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